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emmala
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13th-Nov-2010 05:55 pm - from dan savage
What's the best song to have sex to?

"The Lonely Goatherd" from The Sound of Music. If you don't have The Sound of Music—shameful!—then "If Momma Was Married" from Gypsy.
26th-Jul-2010 12:32 pm(no subject)
i was walking to work thinking about how to describe rebecca and sorelle's wedding to my goyishe coworkers and thinking about how weddings are generally described: oh it was beautiful, the service was beautiful, it was innovative it was this it was that. and really none of that makes sense for a traditional jewish weddding. the service is the same, either the rebe is dull or interesting and either can sing or can't.that's kinda it. i suppose you can comment on the bride but that's different.

this wedding: the rebe was great, she explained enough without being dull sorelle collapsed (she's not a bride so what do you say? participant, half of the couple?) because of the heat and half of the ceremony was conducted with them sitting on the floor. that was perfectly appropriate and in someways more romantic. but about the service there's not a lot else you can say. they managed to get their timing on the glasses perfect that was cool. the chuppah was made of their talit a cute idea. with natural wooden poles.

friday my first baby shower. for a coworker i made her a baby quilt.
saturday the first of my chohort of friends getting married (will and carlos were the first of my friends but they are older so only half count. also i couldn't make it nyc or mexico city for the events)

i must be getting older.

may there be many more!!
6th-Jan-2010 06:42 pm - logan these days
hey
i'm flying out of logan on air tran this saturday and wondered if anyone had on the ground reports on how nuts security has been this week. any experience.
30th-Nov-2009 10:29 am(no subject)
i cannot believe it's been 10 years. i was a baby banned from going to the support demo at government center and now i'm an old burned out tired out geezer whose a veteran of my own battles and organizing drives.

mostly what i'm thinking of is how thankful i am you vets. you inspired me, you taught me to be strong and keep going. you reassured me on the streets, fed me post arrest beer and cookies, and taught me how to deal with ptsd, you gave me words and skills to explain things to the babies who followed me. you motivated me. you motivated hundereds of us. thousands of us. you gave us so much.

enough shmaltz.

you really just kicked ass and showed how it should be done!

love love love
and solidarity to all you seattle veterans!
11th-Nov-2009 04:54 pm - unabashadly stollen. Bad month.

Red November, black November,
Bleak November, black and red.
Hallowed month of labor’s martyrs,
Labor’s heroes, labor’s dead.

Labor’s wrath and hope and sorrow,
Red the promise, black the threat,
Who are we not to remember?
Who are we to dare forget?

Black and red the colors blended,
Black and red the pledge we made,
Red until the fight is ended,
Black until the debt is paid.

— By Ralph Chaplin
author of Solidarity Forever

Nov. 5, 1916, over 200 Industrial Workers of the World members were headed to the docks of Everett, Washington, on the ship Vernoa to participate in a Free Speech Fight in support of the rights of union members to speak on the street corners. While they attempted to dock, a group of over 500 deputy sheriffs opened fire on the peaceful unarmed crowd, killing 11 and wounding 27. This is known as the Everett Massacre.

Nov. 11, 1887, four of the anarchist leaders of the Chicago eight-hour movement were executed because they advocated ideas of workplace justice. Albert Parsons, August Spies, George Engle, and Adolph Fischer are now forever known as the Haymarket Martyrs. In June of 1893 Illinois Governor John Peter Atgeld issued posthumous pardons to these men, proclaiming them victims of a biased judge and a packed jury.

Nov. 11, 1919, a group of Legionaries marching to celebrate Armistice Day attacked an IWW union hall in Centralia, Washington. The IWW members fought back, killing four of their attackers before being captured and taken to jail. That night Wesley Everest was taken from his cell. He was castrated, then taken to a bridge and hung. While hanging over a river he was shot full of holes. Then his body was taken back to the jail and laid out in view of the other prisoners for several days. This is known as the Centralia Massacre.

Nov. 13, 1974, union activist Karen Silkwood was killed when her car was mysteriously run off the road. There was enough evidence to suggest foul play.

Nov. 19, 1916, IWW organizer, songwriter, and troubadour Joe Hill was executed by the State of Utah after being convicted of murder on flimsy circumstantial evidence. A worldwide movement to free Joe Hill included the Swedish Government and a plea from President Wilson for a “thorough reconsideration of the case,” to no avail.

Nov. 22, 1886, in Thibodaux, Louisiana, by some accounts between 30 to 100 striking black sugar workers were massacred. A newspaper of that time recorded, “Lame men and blind women shot. Children and hoary-headed grandsires ruthlessly swept down! The Negros offered no resistance, they could not as the killing was unexpected…”

Nov. 29, 1919, in the town of Bogalusa, Louisiana, once stood the world largest lumber mill, owned by the Goodyear Corporation. The United Brotherhood of Carpenters attempted to organize the mill, with wide support from the mill hands. After a lengthy campaign of intimidation, terror, and beatings the company goons attacked the union hall, killing four Brotherhood organizers. Lem Williams, Stanley O’Rourke, J.P.Bouchillon, and Thomas Gains were cold-bloodedly gunned down as they sat in the office of the Bogalusa’s Central Trades and Labor Council.

11th-Nov-2009 04:41 pm - latest coney development.
What do we think of the city buying a large chunk of coney?

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/12/nyregion/12coney.html?_r=1&bl
26th-Sep-2009 02:14 pm - the chicken
What do you do with the chicken after you swing it around your head 3 times and kill it?
Do you eat it? Give it to charity to eat? Throw it in the river along with the bread?

What about a rubber chicken will that work?
Are there breeds of chickens that take sins better?
What if you can't find a chicken, would other types of birds work?
If you're not strong enough to swing a chicken can you swing a bantam?
 

For me and many of my friends who were born and raised in Massachusetts but currently live far way we found ourselves reaching out to each other and to folks back home today as we worked through the unique feelings of loss for those of us from our great commonwealth. For us whose entire lives have been lived while Teddy was a senator he took on the role of a constant. Regardless of if we agreed with every vote made or every cause he supported he was there standing up for us. He was always there just as it will be muddy in March, the apples will come in September, the water off the cape will always be colder then we remember it and Teddy will be our senator. It makes any homesickness we feel even stronger because when we go home it wont be the quite the same.
Hugs and love to the whole commonwealth and the Kennedy family in particular. From those of us far away.


20th-Mar-2009 08:29 pm(no subject)
Anti Busing sign from a September 1974 demo at Boston City Hall Plaza "SWIM FOR YOUR LIVES KENNEDY IS DRIVING THE BUS!"

oh teddy
12th-Mar-2009 02:52 pm - Looking for some help

Hello all
I'm a graduate student in the U.S. writing a paper about recent Irish immigration and I'm looking for folks who emigrated to the U.S. between 1975 and 1995 and would be willing to fill out a quick survey about your experience here. I'm writing about the experiences of the "new Irish" (or whatever you want to call yourselves) relating to the Irish-American community and earlier Irish immigrants.  I'm interested in hearing from folks regardless of where you live now.

This is a very informal survey (and process) and obviously any questions you don't feel like answering you can skip. I'm just looking for some personal experiences to flesh out the dry story I've gotten from newspapers and books.  Please also pass this request on to other folks you know who might be willing to help a stumped american grad student. 

If you are interested please email me at elang@gwmail.gwu.edu and I will email you back the survey.

Thanks for your help.
Emma

A bit of background on me so you'll know this is legitimate.

I am an MA student in Museum Studies at George Washington University aiming to become a curator in historical museums after I graduate. The paper I am writing is for a class on Immigration and Ethnicity I am taking at American University to as part of the half of my course that must be taken in an academic field.

My primary area of interest is the North Atlantic world and the interactions between the United States and Canada and other English speaking countries.

I got my undergraduate degree from the Universtity of Massachusetts at Amherst and spent a semester studying at U.C.C.

I was born raised in the Boston area and while not of Irish decent became curious at the impact of the Irish community on the  area.

p.s. sorry about the cross posting.
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